Celebrating VE Day.

Hello everyone. This blog is for all of you…. I hope you enjoy reading this, I certainly enjoyed finding out about music in the 1940s. There are ideas here for you all to try, and a couple of questions in the last section for you to answer….

This Friday, May 8th is the 75th Anniversary of VE (Victory in Europe) day. This marked the end of the Second World War in Europe.

I wondered what kind of musical activities the children from our school in the 1940’s would have taken part in. What sort of songs they sang, musical games they played, and the sort of music they enjoyed listening to.

1 -There was a ‘Saturday Morning Picture House’ at local cinemas for children, that included a ‘Welcome’ song, which they would all sing, then several cartoons, a short film and also a drama serial. This did stop during WW2 as many children were evacuated from main towns, but started up again after the war. Popular Songs for children:Many of these came from the early Disney films such as: Snow White, Mickey Mouse, Pinnochio,

 

Here is one of the songs from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

Snow White

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2 -Every household had a radio at this time, and there was a programme that was one hour long, broadcast every day between 5pm and 6pm, called “Children’s Hour”.

The title of the programme came from a poem by an American poet called Henry Longfellow:

“Between the dark and the daylight,

When the night is beginning to lower,

Comes a pause in the days occupations

That is known as The Children’s Hour…”

 

This programme was aimed at children between the ages of 5 – 15 years and contained songs, talks, quizzes, plays, music, and traditional drama serials (eg: Box of Delights by  John Masefield). There was a nursery sing-song for younger listeners and also Toy Town, with Larry the Lamb, who had lots of adventures.

 

Children’s Hour was presented by Derek McCulloch (Head of children’s broadcasting), known to the children as ‘Uncle Mac’, and he introduced songs like this:

Children’s Hour Prayers, including the singing of favourite hymns, was added to the programme during wartime.

 

– Sparkys Magic Piano: started in 1940’s on the radio, but it was also added to a children’s comic, just after WW2. It was a serial about a boy who didn’t like practising the piano. One day the piano started talking to him, saying that he would show him what it was like to play the piano well, and that all he has to do is to run his fingers over the keys…

 

 

  • Try and make your own Children’s Hour programme, choosing, a favourite song, a short favourite story, a piece of music, maybe have a quiz, and test your family. Then sing a favourite hymn and a prayer to finish. It doesn’t need to last more than a few minutes, and you could perform it to your family.

 

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3 – Singing Playground games  

Download (PDF, 4.11MB)

When playing outside together in the 1940’s, popular children’s games would often include songs and chants eg . What’s the time Mr Wolf?

Skipping rope games were very popular, for example: ‘Blue bells, cockle shells’       p23 CD 21/22/23), and ball games included ‘Matthew, Mark, Luke and John’ .

Other singing games examples: Grand Old Duke of York; There was a Princess long ago, and Here we go Looby Loo,which evolved into the Hokey Cokey in the 1950’s. You can see from the dates of the photos that these were all played during the WW2. and would have been passed down by word of mouth from parents and grandparents.

  • Follow the instructions to try out some of these in the garden.

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4 – Party games in the 1940’s: These included many of the games that we play today, eg Musical Statues and Pass the Parcel.

  • Why not play these games with your family…

 

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5 – Nursery Rhymes

Mary had a little lamb, Humpty Dumpty, Polly put the kettle on, Sing a song of Sixpence, She’ll be coming round the mountain…. To name but a few…do you recognise any of these…? Try singing the ones that you recognise…

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6 – Popular WW2 Songs for you to sing:

It’s a Long Way to Tipperary/Pack up your troubles

It’s a long way to Tipperary,

It’s a long way to go,

It’s a long way to Tipperary,

To the sweetest girl I know.

 

Goodbye, Piccadilly,

Farewell, Leicester Square,

It’s a long, long way to Tipperary,

But my heart’s right there.

 

It’s a long way to Tipperary,

It’s a long way to go,

It’s a long way to Tipperary,

To the sweetest girl I know.

 

Goodbye, Piccadilly,

Farewell, Leicester Square,

It’s a long, long way to Tipperary,

But my heart’s right there.

 

Pack up your troubles in your old kit-bag,

And smile, smile, smile,

While you’ve a smile to light your day,

Smile, boys, that’s the style.

What’s the use of worrying?

It never was worthwhile, so

Pack up your troubles in your old kit-bag,

And smile, smile, smile.

 

 

Keep the Home Fires Burning

They were summoned from the hillside,

They were called in from the glen,

And the country found them ready

At the stirring call for men.

Let no tears add to their hardship,

As the soldiers pass along,

And although your heart is breaking,

Make it sing this cheery song:

 

 

Keep the home fires burning,

While your hearts are yearning,

Though your lads are far away

They dream of Home;

 

There’s a silver lining

Through the dark clouds shining,

Turn the dark cloud inside out,

‘Til the boys come home.

 

Overseas there came a pleading,

‘Help a nation in distress!’

And we gave our glorious laddies,

Honour made us do no less.

For no gallant Son of freedom

To a foreign yoke shall bend,

And a noble heart must answer

To the sacred call of ‘Friend’.

 

Keep the home fires burning,

While your hearts are yearning,

Though your lads are far away

They dream of Home;

 

There’s a silver lining

Through the dark clouds shining,

Turn the dark cloud inside out,

‘Til the boys come home.

 

Hey Mr Miller

Hey Mister Miller,

What a swing that you bring to the band.

Hey Mister Miller,

What a swing that you bring to the band.

 

With your trombone and your saxophone,

You can hear it all through the land.

With your trombone and your saxophone,

You can hear it all through the land.

 

 

Ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba da ba da ba

Da ba da ba ba ba

Da ba doo wah!

Ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba da ba da ba

Da ba da ba ba ba

Da ba doo wah!

White Cliffs of Dover 1942 White Cliffs

There’ll be bluebirds over the white cliffs of Dover
Tomorrow, just you wait and see
There’ll be love and laughter and peace ever after
Tomorrow when the world is free

(The shepherd will tend his sheep)
(The valley will bloom again)
And Jimmy will go to sleep
In his own little room again

There’ll be bluebirds over the white cliffs of Dover
Tomorrow, just you wait and see

<instrumental interlude>

There’ll be bluebirds over the white cliffs of Dover
Tomorrow, just you wait…and see

We’ll Meet Again We’ll Meet Again
Words & Music by:
Ross Parker & Hughie Charles
1939
We’ll meet again
Don’t know where
Don’t know when
But I know we’ll meet again some sunny day

Keep smilin’ through
Just like you always do
Till the blue skies drive the dark clouds far away

So will you please say hello
To the folks that I know
Tell them I won’t be long
They’ll be happy to know
That as you saw me go
I was singing this song

We’ll meet again
Don’t know where
Don’t know when
But I know we’ll meet again some sunny day

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…..And finally…..

 

 

7 – Here are clips of a four other popular artists of the early 1940’s:

 

Andrews sisters an American trio of 1940s

Andrews Sisters

Q: Which instrument do you see at the beginning of this clip…?

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Bing Crosby originally sang White Christmas in 1942

Bing Crosby

Q: Bing Crosby sang this song in the early 1940s, but when was the film White Christmas actually made?

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Glen Miller and his big band.

Glen Miller

Q: What instrument did Geln Miller (the leader of the big band) play?

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Leroy Anderson (composer)

Leroy Anderson

Q: Can you follow the score of this music? Does this music have a 2, 3, or a 4 ‘feel’ to it? The ‘tick tock’ is on the bottom line of the score (which is 4 lines deep). Can you follow it and play along at the right time…?

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A song for choir and Whole school

Hello everyone. This is a wonderful song about rainbows. I thought that bearing in mind we have had a lot of sun and then a lot of rain, it would be appropriate. Also rainbows let us show our amazing NHS how much we appreciate them, so we could all sing it for them next Thursday perhaps…..

Download (PDF, 774KB)

YEAR 4  Week 2  Music

Year 4 Week 1 Music

Remind yourself how to play notes C -G on your brass instrument. If you haven’t played in a little while, it will take a bit of blowing to get used to it again. Try long note C a few times. Maybe time yourself, can you do a little longer each time?

 

Look at the music we have learned before, choose one piece this week to get really good at and see if you can learn it off by heart.

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YEAR 4  Week 2  Music

 

Hello Year 4. How is the Brass playing? Can you remember the 5 notes that you have learned? C  D  E  F and G….  Last week I sent you chart for Trumpet fingerings and Trombone Slide positions. Use these to try this page of music. It uses the notes E  F  G.

Download (PDF, 819KB)

 

Try all or some of the music, but the main tune on this page is at the bottom….Acapulco Bay. It is part of a DUET (2 lines of music played at the same time) and next week I will give you the second part to try. There is also an accompaniment so we have lots of options.

 

The five notes that you can play are the first part of a MAJOR SCALE  8 notes:  Do-re-mi-fa-so-la-ti-do…

…….(like in the film Sound of Music. See if you can ask a grown up to help you find a clip of this to watch and singalong.)

 

We think of MAJOR as sounding happy.

When music is sad, we call it MINOR.

 

Here is a song for you to sing about Happy and Sad; Major and Minor.

 

 

The King’s Feelings:

 

  1. Long ago there was a king,

Who couldn’t show his feelings.

He didn’t know how to express

Happiness and sadness.

And so he sent for his music Major

Major, major

He sent for his music Major

To sing him a happy song, and it went:

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la.

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la.

 

  1. Long ago there was a king,

Who couldn’t show his feelings.

He didn’t know how to express

Happiness and sadness.

And so he sent for his music Minor,

Minor, minor,

He sent for his music Minor

To sing him a sad song, and it went:

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la.

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la.

 

  1. Long ago there was a king,

Who learnt to show his feelings.

The music helped him to express

Happiness and sadness.

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la.

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la.

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la.

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la.

 

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Year 5 May 1st Week 2 Music

Year 5  Week 1 Music

Look at the History of Music Powerpoint. Choose a composer from the Victorian era to find out about. See if you can find a piece of music written by them to listen to.

 

May 1st Week 2 Music

 

Hello Year 5, how are you? Here is a short rhyme for you to say:

 

Coca Cola went to town

Pepsi Cola knocked him down

Doctor Pepper fixed him up

Changed him into Seven up

 

Now can you chant the rhyme and clap on the first word of each line. (This is like a bar of music). Then clap on the first word and the middle word eg Coca and went. This will give you a 2 feel.  Finally can you clap on Coca, Cola, went, town….and continue through the whole rhyme…this gives a 4 feel to each line.…..

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I wonder which composer from the Victorian times you chose to find out about last week. Victoria was Queen for so many years and the CLASSICAL era (Mozart, Haydn, last 1700’s) evolved into the ROMANTIC era as Victoria came to the throne, and lasted roughly until into the early 20th Century after which the MODERN era began.

 

What does all this mean?

CLASSICAL music had strict form and set boundaries in the way music was composed.

In the early 1800’s composers decided that the strict CLASSICAL rules were too rigid, and so began to bend the rules, and experiment with musical ideas.

 

They began to use music to express emotions such as love, grief, and tragedy.

 

One of the most famous composers of the Romantic period was Tchaikovsky (Russian). He is famous for his ballet music (Nutcracker, Sleeping Beauty and Swan Lake)

 

Listen to Tchaikovsky’s Russian Dance from Nutcracker. This is an energetic piece:

Now could you do as you did with the Coco Cola rhyme only backwards. See if you can firstly clap to the obvious quick beat of this piece, then try a clap that is twice as slow. When that feels secure, try a beat that is twice as slow again.

You are developing a sense of pulse and have clapped to a one beat, a two beat and a four beat pulse.

Listen once more and be aware that there are 3 short sections in this piece. Are they the same or different? Are they all as ‘busy’, or is there a contrast?

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Try and listen and match the descriptive words: tragic; fun; romantic; to:

Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet Overture

Last movement of his 6th Symphony

Swan Lake, Dance of the Cygnets

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 Year 3  Week 2  Music

Year 3  Week 1 Music

Have a go at your recorder practise for ‘Crazy Daze’ and if you are feeling brave, try ‘Movie Buster’

 

 

 Year 3  Week 2  Music

 

Hello Year 3. Hope you have had a good week.

In the music we sing, play and listen to there is always a steady heartbeat. When you listen to music you are very likely to tap your feet along to the beat.

 

Here is a rap-type rhyme to wake up your feet!!…. Chant it while you tap your feet in time.

 

Pulse is a stea-dy beat

Feel it mo-ving in your feet

Al-ways stea-dy keep in time

Tap your feet and say this rhyme

 

You could finish the verse with a different action each time; for example – clap your hands and say this rhyme….  You could try moving around while chanting as well….lots of possibilities.

This rap has a steady heartbeat – it’s called the PULSE, or the BEAT.

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Can you play your recorder in time? You have been playing Crazy Daze and maybe trying Movie Buster. Let’s move on to a piece called Dublin Dan, and one called St Louis Blues.

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Don’t forget to use the Descant recorder charts to check which fingers to use. Try clapping the PULSE along with the backing track, as in the rap, then try clapping the RHYTHM. Look at the names of the notes and their fingerings, and finally try the whole piece. Good luck and have fun. (Click to open these)

Dublin Dan:

St Lewis Blues:

Download (PDF, 663KB)

 

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Year 1.  Music. Week 2

Year 1.  Music. Week 2

 

Hello everyone.

I would like to introduce you to Jake. He is my toy cat, who comes to music lessons with me.

He is very good at patting his paws on his knees….. especially patting his knees in time with the music.

Why don’t you listen to your favourite music and see if you can pat your knees in time with it. Well done.

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Do you have a favourite cuddly toy, like Jake?

Copy me. I’m going to put him in the middle of the floor and pretend that he is asleep. Shhh….. Now I’m going to creep around him very, very quietly.

…….now I’m going to clap very, very loudly, 3 times….and wake him up.

 

I’m going to creep around him again, but this time, I’ll stamp very, very loudly, to wake him up….

I think he’s awake!!

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You could do this next part anywhere….in the house or garden…

 

Now could you ask a grown up to tap very quietly (at a steady pulse) on something, it could be anything…..a pan, a cup, just as long as it’s quiet. You need to creep around on tip-toes, so you can hear the gentle tapping. Try and creep in time with the tapping.

-Suddenly your grown up should stop tapping…..and you must immediately freeze!!!

-Do this several times…..(It’s a bit like musical statues!)

 

NOW FOR A CONTRAST – (something completely different)

-Ask your grown up to play their steady beat loudly.

-You need to march around, lifting your knees up, and swing your arms. When the steady beat suddenly stops, you freeze, as before!!!

 

FINALLY:

Ask your grown up play quietly or loudly, but not to tell you which one they are going to do. You need to listen and move accordingly!!!

 

WELL DONE!!

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Do thank your grown up for helping you with your musical movement. Ask if you can do anything to help them…..

Here is a Song to learn to help you.

Download (PDF, 461KB)

 

Now for the rhyme we say at the end of the lesson: Can you find your Tick Tock fingers?

(Point your index fingers up and pretend they are windscreen wipers, moving from side to side in time with the rhyme).

 

Tick, tock, tick, tock,

Time to stop, Time to stop,

That’s the end of the lesson…….Well Done!

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Year 2 May 1st Music

Year 2 May 1st Music

 

Hello everyone.

I hope you are all well.

Could you sit cross legged with your hands on your knees, and pat your knees in a steady pulse (speed)…..not too fast and not too slow…..Good.

 

Patting my knees at a set speed reminds me of the story of the Tortoise and the Hare.  Can you read the story and sing the songs in the story here?

Download (PDF, 832KB)

The Tortoise was very, very slow. Could you pat your knees very, very SLOWLY and sing the a nursery rhyme……like Hickory Dickory Dock……. very, very SLOWLY at the same time?

 

Does it feel right?

 

The Hare was very, very fast. Could you pat your knees very, very fast and sing the same rhyme very, very FAST at the same time?

 

Does this feel right?

 

Hmm… I think we need to be somewhere in the middle, as we did at the beginning of the lesson.

Try this with other song and rhymes that you know.

 

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This video clip is from a film called The Sound Of Music, and this song about PITCH, which is where sounds go up and down. Do listen and have a singalong.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drnBMAEA3AM&list=RDdrnBMAEA3AM&start_radio=1&t=116&t=116

Do-re-mi-fa-so-la-ti-do. 8 notes going up in pitch. These 8 notes are called an OCTAVE. Try singing UP and DOWN the notes.

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Do keep going with your African Song, and I will show you another one with actions soon.

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Now for the rhyme at the end of the lesson. Can you find your Tick Tock fingers?

(Put your index fingers up in the air and wave your hands like windscreen wipers in time with the rhyme).

 

                                                                             To help you with the rhythm and pulse:

Tick, tock, tick, tock,                                (Swish hands on each word)

Time to stop, time to stop,                     (Swish hands on Time, & stop)

That’s the end of the les-son.                (Swish hands on That’s, end, les, son.)

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Year 6 Music week 2

Year 6 Music week 2

Hello Year 6.

I hope you managed to have a look at Purple Mash and sequencing last time.

This week I would like you to listen to possibly one of the most famous pieces of music in the world at the moment……..

Do you know the tune “Somewhere over the Rainbow”? ( We’ve been singing it for our amazing NHS) This is also a famous tune but just sing the first 2 notes…..some-where

You are singing the interval of an octave, which you could know is two notes 8 notes apart.

(eg C-C)

The mystery tune is similar, but the second note is 9 notes (!) higher than the first note. (A very unusual interval) and then drops to the octave note.

Underneath it, there is a repeated MOTIF, of 3 notes together and then 1 note on its own.

(Try saying …ve-ry good food, ve-ry good food, (di-di-di da) several times to get the feel of this)

Any ideas as to what this music could be…? Do let me know if you’ve guessed it by now…

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/ten-pieces/classical-music-delia-derbyshire-doctor-who-theme/zfh792p

 

Watch the short documentary introduced by Segun Akinola and listen to the music for real.

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Interesting thoughts about experimenting with sounds and recording them. Try experimenting for yourself.

Reception.  Week 2.  Music.  

Reception.  Week 2.  Music.  

Hello everyone. I have looked at your class blog and I saw that someone was learning the guitar… How marvellous. I’ll look forward to hearing it when we get back to school. I wonder if anyone else plays a musical instrument?

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This is a rhyme about a postman, a milkman and the person who collects all our rubbish from our houses.     (Pat your hands on your knees, for Rat, tat, tat)

 

Rat, tat, ta-t, here comes the post-man,  

Rat, tat, tat, he’s at my door-,

Rat, tat, ta-t, there go the let-ters,

Rat, tat, tat, on to the floor.

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Chink, chink, chink , here comes the milk-man,       (Clap hands for Chink, chink, chink)

Chink, chink, chink , he’s at my door,

Chink, chink, chink , there go the bot-tles,

Chink, chink, chink, on to the floor.

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Bang, bang, bang, there goes the dust-man,   ( Bang on the floor very loudly)

 Bang, bang, bang, outside the door,

Bang, bang, bang, there go the dust-bins,

Bang, bang, bang, on to the floor.

 

Well done everyone. Excellent rhythmic speaking!

 

This week, could you ask someone at home to find the Nursery Rhyme:

The Grand Old Duke Of York, and sing it very loudly, and march in time with the music.

-Then could you find Hickory Dickory Dock, and try singing that very quietly, creeping softly like a little mouse.

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Now for the rhyme we say at the end of the lesson: TICK TOCK

Can you find your Tick Tock fingers? (Put your index fingers up in the air and move fingers like windscreen wipers, in time with the rhyme)

 

Tick, tock, tick, tock,

Time to stop,  Time to stop,

That’s the end of the lesson………..Well Done!

 

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Hello!

Hello! My name is Mrs Hanna and I am your new Music Teacher!

Mrs Hughes has been telling me about all the musical things you do at St John’s, and I’m really looking forward to meeting and teaching you music when we are able to return to school. Until that time, I will carry on with the Music Blog, where you will find musical tasks and songs to sing.

I love music in any shape or form. I play the French Horn (an instrument made of brass, found in the orchestra), the piano, the recorder, and a little bit of guitar. I also love singing, a fantastic way for anyone to express themselves, and have sung in lots of choirs.

I am married, have two children, both at secondary school, and have two cats called Mini and Coco.

See you soon!!!